Code Ninjas

Students receive instruction during a summer camp that teaches coding skills. A grand opening for a Tulsa branch of Code Ninjas, 10126 S. Memorial Drive, Suite B, is scheduled for Saturday. Courtesy

Prakash Subramaniam wanted a way to stimulate his 12-year-old son’s intellect the way a summer robotics camp did.

That led him on a mission to create a local Code Ninjas.

The center allows children to learn computer coding and problem-solving skills while building video games. The grand opening for the Tulsa branch of Code Ninjas is from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at 10126 S. Memorial Drive, Suite B.

“It has been a passion of mine to educate the next generation of Oklahomans and for them to be able to compete globally,” Subramaniam, of Bixby, said in an email. “Computer coding will help level the playing field for our kids. My goal is to change kids from consumers of technology to creators of it.”

Originally from Malaysia, Subramaniam moved to Oklahoma two decades ago to attend college and be near family. After graduating from Oklahoma State University with a finance degree, he has spent the past 20-plus years working in the IT and finance industry.

“I thought opening a Code Ninjas in Tulsa was the best way to make an impact in the community, while helping to fill gaps in the education system,” Subramaniam said in a statement.

Code Ninjas is open to children ages 7-14. The self-paced, game-based curriculum is comprised of nine belts, just like martial arts. Code “senseis” assist students as they advance from white to black belt.

The primary “senseis” at the Tulsa location are college students focusing on computer science studies. Upon the completion of the program, the student will publish an app in an app store.

Code Ninjas founder and CEO David Graham is a professional software developer who previously owned a successful chain of coding camps for adults.

After numerous inquiries from parents, Graham realized there was demand to teach children coding skills. He launched Houston-based Code Ninjas in 2016.


Featured video

Driver Impairment Awareness Day has locals smoking weed and driving

Read the story: Drunk, high drivers brave course for Driver Awareness Impairment Day

Subscribe to Daily Headlines

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Rhett Morgan

918-581-8395

rhett.morgan@tulsaworld.com

Twitter: @RhettMorganTW